Spay and Neuter Awareness Month: Mythbusting Reasons to Not “Fix” Your Dog

Spay/Neuter Awareness Month:  Mythbusting Reasons to Not “Fix” Your Dog

by Lynn Stacy-Smith

Spay/Neuter Awareness Month: Reasons to Not "Fix" Your DogI did not neuter Jackson until he was a little over two and a half years old. I spent a good two years running into issues when I wanted to take him to training classes, dog parks and other areas. “He’s still intact because he’s competing in conformation shows,” I would explain, “Not because of ignorance or any other reason.”

On Jackson’s first birthday I sent several photos of him to our breeder as well as a Happy Birthday message to his litter mate who she had kept. She messaged me back and said, “Jackson is turning out to be spectacular, if you want you can hold of neutering him and try him out in a few UKC (United Kennel Club) shows and then depending how he does maybe we will change his AKC registration from Limited to full and think about using him as a stud dog.”

I cancelled the appointment I had already made to have him neutered, registered him with the UKC, and started training with him on the skills he would need in a dog show. We practiced gaiting and stacking, and I envisioned him going all the way to Madison Square Garden and being on TV representing his breed in Best In Group and being the Labrador to finally win Best in Show. I found hot pink dress pants to pop against his black fur, put on functional shoes and we were ready!

In reality we did three dog shows. We earned a few Best of Breeds and a third in the Gun Dog Group, which is the UKC version of the Sporting Group. Each time I laughed at myself as we drove to shows that took place in warehouse type spaces in industrial parks in suburban Illinois, a far cry from Madison Square Garden.

At the third show we won Best of Breed and headed to the group competition. There were a ton of dogs there that day, far more than the first few shows. Jax was more interested in playing that day and tried to befriend the Golden Retriever…in the middle of the competition. When the judge came to inspect him, Jackson rolled over on his back with all four paws in the air. Then we ran out of bait and I lost his focus entirely. As he tried to jump on top of the Golden again, I politely took my dog and left the ring. I wasn’t angry, I wasn’t upset, I doubt it was proper etiquette, but I just did not want to be that person whose dog was distracting the other well-behaved dogs.

“Well, big man, I think that is the end of your show career, what do you think?” He nuzzled my face and snorted, which is one of my favorite Jax signature moves. “Come on, let’s go home to Daddy and Tinkerbell. I’ll get you a puppacino on the way home, my handsome boy.”

A few weeks later I made the appointment to neuter him and spay Tinkerbell, who was coming up on seven months old, the same day. Had I hired a professional handler, I’m sure Jax could have had a stellar show career; the reality was that he already had a full-time dog job: to be my best friend and companion. I would never be the person to send him off with a handler, on airplanes and in strange places without me, just for him to be a champion.

After the procedures, Jax was my same quirky and special boy and Tinkerbell my same crazy girl. Literally nothing about their activity level or temperament changed, at least once they healed. Of course you have to keep them calm and on kennel rest while they heal, but after that they were the exact same dogs.

Jax was still a typical boy, peeing on every single tree, light post and mailbox (if I’d let him) on our walks, somehow able to ration his urine to make it through a long walk and still be able to claim every single vertical object as his own. Tink was still insane with endless energy, running zoomies as fast as her legs could carry her and then snuggling sweetly with us every night.

Too often I hear some interesting reasons for not spaying or neutering a dog, usually online in various groups and forums and occasionally at pet expos. It goes back to the Woof in Love, Laugh, Woof. Woof means celebrating the differences between our species and understanding that your dog is a dog and not trying to push human feelings onto them. Let’s take a look at some of the wrong reasons for not spaying/neutering a dog:

Females need to experience giving birth to a litter: Emotional regret over not having offspring is entirely a human thing. Although I love to celebrate a mother dog’s love for her puppies, your dog is not staring out the window wondering why she never had puppies. That doesn’t mean a dog doesn’t have a strong maternal instinct, but it kicks in after she is pregnant. Dogs live in the moment, your dog is perfectly happy experiencing other things besides giving birth to puppies. Take her on adventures instead, she will love you even more for sharing such amazing bonding experiences and it will never cross her mind that she did not “get” to have pups.

Still a big boy, happily neutered!

Neutering makes males less male: Well, if you’re talking about moving mountains to get to females in heat, embarrassing dog erections for no reason, or marking your furniture, yes, neutering will change that. But in terms of the good parts of a boy dog, there is no difference. Your male dog does not care that he lost his testicles. That’s a human hangup. Although the procedures are definitely different, your male dog is still just as male as a man who has a vasectomy. All that’s changed is their ability to have an heir. Unless your dog is the King of England, he doesn’t need an heir. Period.

“Fixing” a dog makes them fat: Just like we humans, too many calories and too little activity makes dogs fat. If you see them gaining weight, adjust their calories. I promised a “no fat Labs” promise and have kept to it. Jax and Tink weigh exactly the same as before they were spayed and neutered.  You are in control of how much you feed your dog, how much exercise he or she gets, and ultimately how much they weigh, intact or sterilized.

Children should experience the miracle of life: I call BS on this. I am a parent, there are books for that, they take classes on that in health class. There is no logical reason for a child to learn about the miracle of life by bringing innocent puppies into the world. Parents who really want their children to see the process can view a variety of births on YouTube. It is miraculous, I once sat and watched a professional breeder’s dog give birth via webcam for an entire afternoon; I was not going to submit Tinkerbell to that just for the experience.

If you hear friends talking about breeding their dogs, please have the important conversation with them, asking them to reconsider and ask them not to become a backyard breeder. If none of the arguments above are sufficient, there are 1.2 million other reasons not to breed, in the form of dogs who are euthanized each year because a home was not available to them.

 

 

Leave a Reply